Crunch Time in Oklahoma – Primary Vote July 27th! – Endorsements and Reference Links for You to Share

OKLAHOMA R3PUBLICANS

It is crunch time in Oklahoma again!

We encourage you to get out and vote.

Early Voting is NOW!


Primary Election is on Tuesday – July 27th 7AM-7PM

Multiply your vote by sharing info with friends and neighbors.

Add information about your local races.

Share this information via email or phone or over the back fence.

Take a friend to the polls with you on Tuesday.


Oklahoma R3publicans participate with other groups in Oklahoma to provide timely information via OKgrassroots online.  OK R3s are working to restore the republic in the Republican party in Oklahoma. Our state is one of the “reddest” in the nation and we are pleased to be a part of that dynamic.  R3s are grassroots, philosophically constitutional people of principle actively working to inspire Republicans to positive action.  We believe that powers not expressly delegated to the federal government are reserved to the states and to the people.  Our efforts across Oklahoma are focused on limited constitutional government.


We recently published our For the Win in 2010 Series Online

It is worth noting that people working to restore the republic have been involved in all phases of the primary season and are working hard to elect people with constitutional limited government principles, so in one sense this is a formal way of letting everyone know who we have been helping and working with this season.

Candidates in the Spotlight in OK GOP Primary Races 2010

Senate Districts

David McLain District 10 (Pawhuska, Cleveland, Tulsa)

Anthony Sykes District 24 (Moore to Duncan)

Tim Clem District 28 (Seminole, Wewoka, Stroud, Chandler, Jones etc.)


House Districts

Tom Newell District 28 (Seminole County)

Jason Murphey District 31 (Logan County, far North Edmond)

Jay Ramey District 66 (Downtown Tulsa)

Kyle Coulter District 94 (Del City)


Congressional Seats

CD01 Nathan Dahm

CD02 Howard Houchen

CD04 RJ Harris


Statewide Races

Governor Randy Brogdon

State Treasurer Owen Laughlin

Commissioner of Labor Mark Costello

Note:  In races not listed R3s made no endorsement and we did not list uncontested races.



R3PUBLICANS  offer these links as informational sources which may be helpful to you as voters and should not be taken as an endorsement by R3PUBLICANS.  If you know of a good constitutional conservative voter resource, please  add your information to the list below in the comments online!

OK-SAFE Non-Partisan Oklahoma Voter Guide


OCPAC is a well known conservative group in OKC led by Charlie Meadows


League of Women’s Voters of Oklahoma


General Information from the Oklahoma State Election Board


Note:  The primary is where you get to vote for the BEST candidate!


Blockwalking in Oklahoma – A Nebraskan’s Perspective

Oklahoma Republican Voters Vocal and Not Happy.

What does that mean?

By Shelli Dawdy

Of course one night walking blocks for a couple of candidates isn’t necessarily an indicator of a trend. But it’s interesting when it coincides with national polling results in at least one important aspect. (See this Gallup poll regarding party affiliation.)

While out walking blocks yesterday in two Oklahoma neighborhoods, several folks either indicated they were no longer Republicans or would not be voting. In one instance, a gentleman who is known to be more liberty-oriented by his neighbors flatly refused to change his registration back to Republican even to vote for liberty-minded candidates. Perhaps that particular fellow is a rarity, its one thing to answer “Independent” to a pollster, it’s another matter to go to the trouble of actually changing one’s voter registration.

Maybe it’s just the particular neighborhoods walked, maybe it’s just Oklahomans as compared to Nebraskans, but when out walking a good chunk of a legislative district in Nebraska in April and May, the people who engaged in conversation didn’t indicate dissatisfaction with the Republican party. In fact, it was largely the opposite. Most simply wanted to know that the candidate was a Republican. It becomes more interesting when another fact is taken into account – because it was a legislative race and Nebraska’s legislature is a Unicameral (purportedly non-partisan), we knocked on EVERY door in neighborhoods. (Of course because we weren’t targeting just registered Republicans, we did get a few negative reactions, but a very few.)

In addition to some OK Republican voters saying that they are no longer Republican, I also encountered another interesting contrast; the number of people who went beyond simply politely accepting the material I was giving them was higher – people wanted to know more. When the candidates’ websites were highlighted on the handouts, there was general interest in visiting those sites.

From my perspective then, the OK voters listed as registered Republicans are either fed up with the party or are at least interested in putting some effort into investigating candidates. Many weren’t aware of the primary election on July 27 but were interested once told.

Of course I can’t be sure what all of this may mean for the July 27 election in Oklahoma, but it seems it might mean one of two things; enough Republicans are so disgruntled they now consider themselves Independents, they may just stay home, or challengers may stand a better chance of pulling off wins in OK than they did in NE. Apparently that seems to hinge upon voters knowing there is a primary and whether the challengers get their names and good information about themselves to those voters.

Voter turnout was low in Nebraska’s May 11 primary. There was clearly a trend by voters there to accept a person with an “R” behind their name. A general lack of inquisitiveness would readily lend itself to a trend that people would vote for the most recognizable name on a ballot and that would be an incumbent. And that’s exactly what happened. Incumbent Republicans won all of the major seats in Nebraska.

Oklahoma state law has set a 60 day deadline in advance of an election for voter registration and that happens to be this Friday.  IF many Republicans actually went to the trouble of changing their party affiliation, it would seem a priority to ensure they change it back to vote for Constitutional, limited government candidates.

Beyond that, anyone who knows of solid candidates, particularly challengers, needs to make an effort to help them get their names and information out to voters, particularly the disgruntled bunch, and motivate them to get to the polls on July 27.

Oklahomans tired of insanely out of control spending and extra-Constitutional governance seem to have some opportunities. The question is…will they take them?

It would be silly of me not to take the opportunity to pitch for the candidates that motivated me to get out and walk. They are Nathan Dahm, who is running for OK’s First Congressional District, and State Senator Randy Brogdon, who is running for Governor. Two other candidates whom I know and heartily support in OK are CD04 Candidate RJ Harris and CD02 Candidate Howard Houchen.

Reprinted with permission from StubbornFacts1776 originally released May 26, 2010

Say What?? A Republican Gave Money to a Democrat? And Wants a Promotion?

What IS Oklahoma doing with a Democrat for a Governor? That question bugs me every time I hear about something else that the fine fellow vetoes, such as the Sovereignty Resolution in 2009 (which the OK Legislature promptly over rode), or more recently, the Firearms Freedom Act.

Perhaps the answer to how a Democrat opposed to State Sovereignty and the Second Amendment (read that as a Constitutional ignoramus) can be found by picking up a few rocks around the state and seeing what crawls out from under them. Yes, an unpleasant business to be sure.

READ THE REST OF THE ARTICLE BY CLICKING HERE